Sportsmen's Bill, Federal Budget Highlights Forest Access

Forest access on federal lands is essential for recreation, timber management, firefighting and law enforcement. Unfortunately the federal government has continued its aggressive efforts to destroy or decommission thousands of miles of forest roads, jeopardizing forested communities and making it difficult to fight fires and restore forests back to health. This critical issue is finally getting some attention among our federal representatives.

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USFWS Response to the Barred Owl Threat

The barred owl was first detected within the range of the northern spotted owl (NSO) in the 1970’s.  Researchers started to become concerned about the impacts the barred owl would have on the NSO in the 1980’s.  In 1989, the USFWS acknowledged that the expansion of the barred owl population was of “considerable concern”.  The NSO was listed as threatened in 1990.  Since then, there has been a steady decline in the NSO population with a concurrent steady increase in the barred owl population.

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Policymakers Should Recognize America’s Leadership in Forestry, Manufacturing

Every year it's estimated the average U.S. citizen uses the equivalent of a tree 100 feet tall, and 18 inches in diameter. We use 3.5 times more wood than we did in 1970. Yet, despite our leadership in the sustainable logging and manufacturing of softwood and hardwood lumber, the United States is a net importer of wood products.  These are important facts as policymakers continue to raise concerns about illegal logging abroad and the safety of imported wood products here at home.

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Jodi Schneider McNamee: Extraordinary combustion- Oregon Forests in Peril

"If future generations are to remember us with gratitude rather than contempt, we must leave them something more than the miracles of technology. We must leave them a glimpse of the world as it was in the beginning, not just after we got through with it."

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T.W. Scott: The Strategy of “Greenspeak,” Is This How the West Will be Lost?

For more than 50 years, there has been a growing campaign against the beneficial use of natural resources.   The campaigners have several names:  preservationists, conservationists, radical environmentalists, and greens.  

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Westside Fire Recovery at Risk, How You Can Help in Two Minutes

Your help is needed to support a major forest recovery effort on the Klamath National Forest.

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Like Strangers in Their Own County

Writing for the Wall Street Journal, Commissioner Chris Brong of Skamania County, Washington reminds readers of the challenges of funding critical services in a forested county when most of the land base is controlled by the federal government. Here's what he had to say:

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Tester Comment Reflects Frustration with Federal Forest Management

Fringe activists are predictably making hay over statements made by Sen. Jon Tester regarding the impact of litigation and the “analysis paralysis” driving federal forest management today.  They are making the most of their “gotcha” moment; one individual went so far as to liken the Democratic senator to Adolf Hitler.  To be clear not every timber sale on Montana’s federal forests is tied up in litigation.  But it sure seems that way to those who've witnessed the steep decline in federal timber harvests and lamented the economic decline of our rural communities.

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Report: Why Wyden's O&C Bill Doesn't "Double" Timber Harvests

Sen. Ron Wyden recently announced the reintroduction of his O&C federal forest legislation, pledging once again to "double" timber harvests as a way to create desperately-needed jobs in rural Oregon.  However, a recent report commissioned by Oregon’s affected counties indicates that the Wyden plan would actually reduce harvest levels. 

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Sheriff Brown: Washington’s Rural Communities Need a Federal Forest Solution

Next year Washington State can continue to play a leading role in efforts to improve the health of our federally-owned forests while restoring economic opportunity to our rural forested communities.  Help can’t come soon enough, especially for county governments. As timber receipt revenues remain low and an extension of “Secure Rural School” payments remain unclear, some counties are faced with massive budget shortfalls that can only be addressed with draconian cuts to services. 

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